Communication

Because D&D requires a lot of information to pass between the DM and players in both directions, clear and concise communication between DM and players is crucial to the success of any campaign.

When making dice rolls, players should first report the natural dice roll, followed by the PC’s attack or skill modifier as recorded on the character sheet, followed by all conditional modifiers to the roll (including the reason for the conditional modifier), and finally, the dice roll total (sometimes called the check result or the attack roll total depending on the context).
  • When reporting an attack roll total, the player should include the defense type that the attack is being made against (Armor Class, Fortitude, Reflex, or Will) as well as the specific opponent.
An example of good communication:
  • Player: I rolled a natural 13, I have +7 on my attack, -2 because I’m prone – giving me a total of 18 against goblin #2’s AC.
  • DM: That hits goblin #2!
  • Player: I roll a 5, plus 3, so a total of 8 points of damage!
  • DM: Okay, goblin #2 takes 8 points of damage and is looking bloodied.
An example of poor communication:
  • Player: I rolled a 13.
  • DM: You mean, you have a natural 13 on the die, or your total is 13?
  • Player: A natural 13. Oh, and I have +7.
  • DM: So your total is 20?
  • Player: Yep.
  • DM: You’re prone, so your attack is at -2.
  • Player: Okay, then 18.
  • DM: An 18 against which opponent?
  • Player: The goblin.
  • DM: Goblin #1?
  • Player: Uh, I don’t know, let me see – nope, Goblin #2.
  • DM: That was an 18 against Goblin #2’s A/C?
  • Player: Hmm, I’m not sure. Nope, it’s against his Reflex.
  • DM: That hits.
  • Player: I roll a 5 on damage.
  • DM: I can see a natural 5 on your dice, so is that your total?
  • Player: Umm, 5 plus 3, so 8.
  • DM: Goblin #2 takes 8 points of damage and looks bloodied.
  • DM (muttering to himself): Good grief, I thought that would never end!

Communication

Arantus PrimrosePaladin