Religion

Religion in Ardwen

The Gods are described in accordance with their relative popularity in Ardwen, from most popular to least popular. Note: Since the campaign begins in Ardwen, this page describes religion from that perspective, which is shaped largely by the legendary period know as The Gifting Time. Other cultures in Arantus may have very different views of the Gods than those described here.

Popular Gods
  • Erathis – By far, the single most popular diety in Ardwen. She is credited with giving The Wards as a gift to Ardwen so that it could establish its civilization, free from the many threats of the outside world.
  • Ioun – Credited with giving Ardwen the knowledge of how to maintain The Wards.
  • Corellon – Admired for his artistry, because a civilized land needs its share of artists and musicians, does it not?
  • Moradin – Credited with teaching Dwarves how to mine and process Rubric Ore.
  • Kord – Credited with giving Ardwen a huge cache of magic weapons, armor, and other items, to defend itself from the monsters that remained inside Ardwen even after The Wards were constructed. However, most of Kord’s original magic items have since been lost, broken, or smelted down to extract their residuum.
  • Pelor – The sun god is popular among Ardwen’s many farmers.
Less Popular Gods
These gods have smaller followings in Ardwen and are considered generally less important to its history. Aside from their followers, most people feel neutral toward them.
  • Melora – She is somewhat popular in River’s End, and with the fishermen of Braemore Lake, but in the rest of Ardwen she is little known.
  • The Raven Queen – The people of Ardwen don’t generally like to think about death, because that means departing from the civilized world they’ve worked so hard to establish, so worship of the Raven Queen is not very common.
  • Sehanine – Admired by Elves and Halflings, but few others.
Unpopular Gods
  • Avandra – Scorned by most people in Ardwen because she is the Goddess of Adventure, and who needs those greedy, trouble-making Adventurers when we have The Wards to protect our glorious civilized land? Her gift to Ardwen was a bunch of useless books, The Tomes of Power, about hiking on paths to pursue adventure, while leaving it to others to do the honest work of farming, fishing, mining, and logging. Centuries of abandonment have left Avandra’s temples old, decrepit, and relegated to remote places. Despite this, she does have a small though loyal following, especially among Halflings, but they keep a very low profile.
  • Bahamut – Ridiculed by most people in Ardwen, Bahamut is seen as an impotent, childish god, popular with children but not to be taken seriously. He is known as The Toy God, because his gift to Ardwen was said to be a ridiculous toy that only little children thought was fun to play with, and otherwise had no practical value to its people. He is regarded in Ardwen the same way we in the modern world think of Barney the Dinosaur – a benign, harmless, fictional beast who appeals to children – only in this case he somehow ascended to godhood. Adults that worship Bahamut are to be pitied, for nobody over the age of seven could take such a story-book god seriously without having their sanity brought into question. Even most Dragonborn disassociate themselves from him, seeing him as a bad role-model for their children!
  • All evil gods are generally very unpopular in Ardwen, though each of them does have their small cults of devoted worshippers lurking in the shadows.

Religion

Arantus PrimrosePaladin